Can you even throw a punch

Help me, Im fat, lazy and afraid of a bully.

When the World Turns VIOLENT! I bet you run.

Are you martially in danger?

All titles to bring on that chilling fear inside and solicit a response - so read on..

ITS DANGEROUS OUT THERE

Its dangerous out there and especially for you..

The enemy may be next door and you dont know it but you got to have the guts too look. What can you really do once you see some violence or get scared or worse because you receive a bashing or king hit - do you hide in your house?

You know that given a situation to be a hero and stop a crime, terrorism or violence you'll be able to step up or chase after them etc - or maybe you'll cower or be the victim.

The danger today is maybe not too obvious to you but you better hone your sensors or youll get hit without seeing it coming.

PHYSICAL COMPETANCE

Have you ever seen raw attack or someone getting 'owned'? Just search google for "martial street fights" - "martial owned" Watch those movies and cringe!!!

http://www. google. com/search? q=martial+owned

http://www. google. com/search? q=martial+street+fights

Kung Fu, Boxing, dancing, balley, incompetance? What will you offer to your attacker?

I can judge I am probably half the strength and endurance form 10 years ago, how about you?

Can you throw a punch or even stand steady on one leg? can you do a round-house or even give a kick to the knee? Ever heard of a combination?

MARTIAL KNOWLEDGE

a martial art is defined as - 1 : of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior 2 : relating to an army or to military life 3 : experienced in or inclined to war : WARLIKE

http://www. martialarm. com/information/martial-arts-definition. html

a martial art is defined as: various forms of self-defense, usually weaponless, based on techniques developed in ancient China, India, and Tibet.

http://www. martialarm. com/information/martial-arts-definition. html

If you’ve never studied a martial art, your awareness of them most likely starts at Bruce Lee movies and ends with the stylized theatrics of The Matrix. If that’s the case, you may not realize from what you’ve gleaned onscreen that there are an estimated 200 unique kinds of martial arts, and within these, thousands of different styles. Karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do are among the most popular and well-known of the martial arts in the U. S., but there are numerous others.

Despite the array of martial arts and styles, most of them share common techniques, and so they can be organized into broad categories that facilitate understanding. The primary way of classifying martial arts is by the basic physical technique they use: striking or grappling.

The different styles can even be related to shapes or geometry - squares, triangles and circles.

MARTIAL TRAINING TO LIVE

Training is hard..really hard. The most hard is to get started and its down-hill easy from there. What you need is a martial arts machine - something new and exciting to get you off your fat ass.

Search for it - martial arts machine - http://www. google. com/search? q=martial+arts+machine

Whats important now is to do something, start with brief excercise, get into stretching, shadow box, then step up and train hard.

GO to the local phone book and look up kung fu or karate. Then give them a call, go along or take your kid.

CONCLUSION IS ACTION

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you petrified.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

If you are not liking what you see in the mirror, afraid to go down a dark street, scared of a potential confrontation then train now.

The martialarm introduction to choy-li-fut

The Martialarm Introduction To Choy-Li-Fut

Choy-Li-Fut is a popular Southern variety of kung-fu in which the opponents oppose from some distance, which necessitate of each the proficient and expert development of long-hand abilities, as well as firm and solid grouning in the body, though the feet must be versatile. The arms are wielded freely and powerfully in a variety of styles: uppercuts, backfists, roundhouses, and overhead foreknuckle thrusts. The Baat Gaw land, willow leaf double swords, and 18 staff can be used in the aggressive kung-fu variety.

As a Southern Shaolin style with Five Animal techniques, Hung Kuen is a close relative of Choi Lei Fut and is said by some Choi Lei Fut branches to be the variety that Chan Yuen-Wu taught founder Chan Heung.

Choi Lei Fut is a characterized as a "soft-hard", "external" variety. The curriculum was designed so that anti-Qing rebels may perhaps concisely gain feasible proficiency and still incorporates a wide range of weapons. Several frequent movements have specific sounds interrelated with them for example, "sik" when throwing punches, "yik" when punching from horse riding stance, "wah" was used when using a Tiger Claw and "dik" when kicking hypothetically so that friendly forces may perhaps recognize each other in battle and to force the practitioner to coordinate his breathing habits with his movements.

Choy Lay Fut training could be done in any city in the world and I call you to visit out martial arts directory of Choy Lay Fut to find a school near you!

Depending on the branch of Choi Lei Fut, Choi Fook is said to have been a master either of Southern Shaolin Kung Fu from Fujian province, he was not related to which was started by Choi Gau-Yee and is cited to have the longest range of the five major family styles of the southern Chinese martial arts.

Lei Yau-San, cited to be a student of Jee Sin while others admit him to be a student of Li Sik Hoi-one of the 5 Ancestors of the Hung Mun, Lei Yau-San is known not only as a teacher of Chan Heung, and lately discovered of Jeung Hung Sing as well, but as the founder of Lei Ga which, like Choi Ga, is one of the five major family styles of the southern Chinese martial arts.

Fut Ga literally "Buddha family," specializes in palm techniques and for this reason is also known as Buddha family Palm, Buddhist Palm, or Buddha Palm. Monk Ching Cho Woh Seung was responsible for spreading the Fut Ga procedure all over Guandong. Both the left and apt hand are used in attack and defense. Long and short-range footwork is employed.

How you train is how you respond

How you train is how you will respond and react in the real deal. Self-defense is about survival and nothing else. It is not about fighting fair, clean or being honorable. It’s about doing what you have to do to go home and see your loved ones once again. You don’t know how a thug is going to react when you connect your first blow to him so make sure you mean it when you attack. He could back off (flight) or become enraged (fight), plane and simple combat is about doing whatever needs to be done so you get out alive. Lie, con, manipulate so you can catch him off guard and administer a tactic. Release the idea from your mind the image of a “DIRTY FIGHTER” there is now such thing. He is actually a smart fighter who knows how to use violence to his advantage. Free your mind of that idea, could mean the difference between life and death, it will subconsciously hamper your actions. You have the right to protect yourself and kill when your life is in jeopardy. When in combative mode your thoughts and actions should be as vile, vicious and violent as possible. Thoughts of legal or moral consequences of your actions should not even cross or enter your mind. If they do it will subconsciously hold you back in giving 100% in your attack and that could mean your kids or loved ones not seeing you again. The importance of training realistically or condition stimulus training could mean the difference between life and death. Training the mind to be accustomed to stimuli that is violent and vile you mean not freezing in violent situations.

Here are some tips and dirty tricks

 HIT FIRST, HIT HARD, KEEP HITTING

 Always attack in mid word or sentence i. e.” I will do anything you say, please don’t hur” ATTACK NOW. The element of surprise is on your side he is not expecting you to do anything.

 Practice saying your trigger sentence or word and cueing yourself to attack when you say it. Make sure your speech is smooth and that you are not telegraphing your words or actions before attacking.

 If you are a woman use the power of “sweet talk” get him to believe that you will do as he says, then turn the tables when he least expects it.

 When speaking use your hands to help you speak, set them up to deflect or to position them closer to the target area you want to attack.

 Use your surroundings, push your attacker into an object so he trips or falls. Giving you time to run off or to follow up with a more devastating tactic to immobilize him.

 Gouge, spit, throw dirt or sand in his eyes to temporarily blind him to give you those vital seconds to get away.

 Make your training as real as possible have your training partner grab you, swear, yell at you and rehearse what you are going to say before you attack

 Remember your “ TRIGGER WORD” to give you the signal to attack.

Martial-arts-for-children

Martial Arts For Children

These days, martial arts are something that everyone should know. With crime at an all time high, knowing how to defend yourself is essential. For the children, martial arts can mean a lot of things. Even though martial arts is great for adults to know and practice as well, it is also a great way for children to stay in shape and learn how to defend themselves from attackers.

Although martial arts can teach children how to defend themselves, it will also teach them self control and self confidence as well. If your child has a bad temper or low self esteem, learning a martial art can actually help them to get back on the right path. Martial arts will help children with life in general - which will take them a lot farther in life.

The first thing you will need to do when getting your child involved in martial arts is pick a style that they will enjoy. With several different styles to choose from, it can be a very difficult choice to make. Among the most popular for children are Karate, Taekwondo, Judo, Muay Thai, and Jiu-Jitsu. When making the decision, you should go by what your child has interests in, such as punching and kicking, or ground grappling and submission.

Once you have a style in mind, you’ll need to start checking out the local martial arts centers and dojo’s. If you live in a big city, you’ll have a lot more to choose from than those who live in smaller areas or rural towns. Those who live in smaller towns or rural areas may be very limited on the choices available for themselves and their children.

Rural and smaller towns are limited in choice, although what they offer is normally among the best styles of martial arts. The instructors are black belts and above, with the highest ranked students helping them instruct classes. If the classes are small in attendance, the instructors and student teachers can spend a lot of hands on time with the kids to help them improve in their weakest areas.

When you decide to enroll your child in martial arts, you should always check out the dojo or classes first. You don’t want your child to be in a class that isn’t goal focused, nor do you want them to have a teacher who doesn’t know what he is teaching. The environment is also important, as you want to be sure that the dojo and equipment are clean, and that everything is up to the latest and greatest standards.

Even though a martial art may be beneficial to your child, it won’t do them any good unless the facilities and the instructors are good. You want to make sure you get the best available to you, which is why it always pays to look around. If you look at all of your available choices, you’ll normally be able to find the best for both you and your child.

When it comes to children and their future, martial arts is a great way for them to start. Martial arts can help them improve in many different areas, not just self defense. A martial art can help a child develop a lot of essential areas, including self control and responsibility. The longer a child studies a martial art, the more goal oriented and responsible they will become. Martial arts are a great investment for parents and children - which is why they are so very popular.

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The-techniques-of-muay-thai

The Techniques Of Muay Thai

A majority of the offensive techniques that are used in Muay Thai utilize a students hands, feet, elbows, and knees to strike an opponent. In order to bind the opponent for both defensive and offensive reasons, there is a small amount of grappling on the feet that is used - the clinch.

The clinch occurs when someone gets in your circle of radius, inside of your comfort zone. To execute knees and short kicks from the inside, the clinch can be very useful. The Thai fighter makes great use of the clinch, tying up on opponent on the feet then pounding his stomach, ribs, knees, and legs with brutal knees. Knees are very popular techniques with Muay Thai, as Thai fighters spend a lot of time training their strikes - especially knees and elbows.

Although high kicks to the opponents head looks amazing during the fights, experienced Thai fighters always say that knees and elbows have a lot more impact, and they do the most damage to the body. If a Thai fighter is very experienced and has enough power in his strikes, he can quickly and easily kill someone with his techniques.

In all Muay Thai techniques, two in particular have become very popular with other styles of martial arts.

The roundhouse kick

The roundhouse Thai kick is a very useful technique for both self defense and competitions, proving to be very efficient when it is executed properly. Thai stylists execute the roundhouse kick by a straight leg and the entire body rotating out from the hip. The hip is locked shortly before the thrown leg makes impact with the opponent. If executed properly, the roundhouse kick can easily render someone unconscious.

The low kick

The low kick is a common Muay Thai attack, that involves a circular movement from the stylist’s body to kick the opponent in his upper shin area. If the low kick isn’t blocked or defended, it can quickly lead to fight being ended. After a few well placed low kicks, the opponent will be unable to put pressure on his legs due to the bruising, and will eventually crumble.

With other martial arts styles, such as Tae Kwon Do, stylists use snapping kicks that are indeed faster to execute, although they have less power. Muay Thai on the other hand, teaches stylists to follow through with kicks, using the shin instead of the foot. Nearly all of the techniques involved with Muay Thai emphasis movement with the entire body, which means rotating the hip each time the stylist kicks, punches, or blocks. The techniques are slower, although they are far more powerful that techniques found in Tae Kwon Do and even Karate.

As a lot of people already know, the training and conditioning training found in Muay Thai is nothing short of legendary for the intensity and rigorous training. The training in Muay Thai aims to harden the weapons used in the martial art to a high degree. Students who have been training in Muay Thai for many years can absorb a beating, yet if they land a shin kick it will feel as if you have just been hit with a sledgehammer.

All in all, Muay Thai is a very dangerous martial art that teaches punishing blows with very little grappling. Thai stylists are physical strong, capable of taking an opponent out with just one well placed strike. Muay Thai is also one of the most well known and most popular styles in the world today - which is why you shouldn’t hesitate to study.

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When the world turns violent

ITS DANGEROUS OUT THERE

Its dangerous out there and especially for you..

The enemy may be next door and you dont know it but you got to have the guts too look. What can you really do once you see some violence or get scared or worse because you receive a bashing or king hit - do you hide in your house?

The danger today is maybe not too obvious to you but you better hone your sensors or youll get hit without seeing it coming.

You know that given a situation to be a hero and stop a crime, terrorism or violence you'll be able to step up or chase after them etc - or maybe you'll cower or be the victim.

TV today scares the shiit out of many people as it promotes violence and turns the meek yellow and nervous.

Were are you on the scared meter of life? Are you out there amongst it or a bit of a shy body or house mummys boy?

PHYSICAL COMPETANCE

Have you ever seen raw bloodlust or someone getting 'owned'? Just search google for "martial street fights" - "martial owned" Watch those movies and cringe!!!

Kung Fu, Boxing, dancing, balley, incompetance? What will you display to your attacker?

Today we are lazy, probably fat too.. Go look in the mirror and skip for ten minutes, then check your image again and what do you see?

I can judge I am probably half the strength and endurance form 10 years ago, how about you?

Can you throw a punch or even stand steady on one leg? can you do a round-house or even give a kick to the knee? Ever heard of a combination?

MARTIAL KNOWLEDGE

a martial art is defined as - 1 : of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior 2 : relating to an army or to military life 3 : experienced in or inclined to war : WARLIKE

a martial art is defined as: various forms of self-defense, usually weaponless, based on techniques developed in ancient China, India, and Tibet.

If you’ve never studied a martial art, your awareness of them most likely starts at Bruce Lee movies and ends with the stylized theatrics of The Matrix. If that’s the case, you may not realize from what you’ve gleaned onscreen that there are an estimated 200 unique kinds of martial arts, and within these, thousands of different styles. Karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do are among the most popular and well-known of the martial arts in the U. S., but there are numerous others.

Despite the array of martial arts and styles, most of them share common techniques, and so they can be organized into broad categories that facilitate understanding. The primary way of classifying martial arts is by the basic physical technique they use: striking or grappling.

Do you even know the diffference between kung fu and karate? Do you think wing chun is a chinese dish?

Or a combination of triangles with small circles as can be seen in chinese trapping, wrist locks or Aikido entry and endings.

Because karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do have been more prominent than other forms in popular culture, from film to sporting events, many people mistakenly believe that all martial arts are Asian in origin. In fact, diverse cultures throughout history from Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East have also given birth to their own martial art forms.

The different styles can even be related to shapes or geometry - squares, triangles and circles.

MARTIAL TRAINING TO LIVE

Training is hard..really hard. The most hard is to get started and its down-hill easy from there. What you need is a martial arts machine - something new and exciting to get you off your fat ass.

Everyone knows someone who knows how to fight - with fists, knives, weapons, guns, tactical, sensless, whatever but START!

Whats important now is to do something, start with brief excercise, get into stretching, shadow box, then step up and train hard.

GO to the local phone book and look up kung fu or karate. Then give them a call, go along or take your kid.

CONCLUSION IS ACTION

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you afraid.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

If you are not liking what you see in the mirror, afraid to go down a dark street, scared of a potential confrontation then train now.

We cant all be Bruce Lee but you also dont want to be an emotional and physical punching bag do you?

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you afraid.

The martialarm intro to aikido

The Martialarm Introduction To Aikido

Aikido was improved by Morihei Ueshiba with the express aim of granting its practitioners to defend against any attack without gravely injuring the attacker. This is in keeping with Ueshiba's religious belief in the value of all life, and the ideal that violent people at large should be shown the error of their ways, not executed. Thus, Aikido is one of the softest styles ever got wind of, based basically on Jujitsu, but confiscating all kicks and punches. As a replacement, the Aikido practitioner shifts her or his body to evade the attack and guides the attacker's body to use their own force against them. Save for, the belief in the value of life does not mean that the Aikido artist will not use more tremendous techniques if they are necessary to insure the practitioner's safety. Throws are used, many of which will originate the attacker to land flat on their back or some other way that could hurt them permanently. Also, locks are used which can potentially squash the attacker's joints. One of the main benefits of Aikido is that being comprised totally of roundish techniques it can be utilised by anyone, no matter how lacking in muscular vitally. Aikido is continued from Zen philosophy which can be seen in its use of meditation and the concept of flow and the unbroken circle which are expressed in all of its techniques. Analogous styles: Aiki-Jujitsu (Also Aikijistu) - The style of Jujitsu that Morihei Ueshiba studied and adapted to create Aikido. "the way of spiritual harmony" or "the way of co-ordinated power"

Aikido training can be done in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of aikido to find a school near you!

Chinese-martial-arts

Chinese Martial Arts

Throughout the world, Chinese martial arts are well known and well respected. China is a pioneer to martial arts, founding several excellent styles. Although Kung Fu is the most well known Chinese martial art, there are others that are just as good. Below, we will look at some of the other Chinese martial arts that aren’t as well known as Kung Fu.

HSING-I

This is actually one of the internal styles of Kung Fu, very closely in relation to Tai Chi. It teaches students to subordinate their bodies, creating powerful movements with a very little expense of energy. HSING-I isn’t well known about, although it is very powerful and well known throughout China. The United States and other areas aren’t that familiar with it, with little to no schools or dojo’s out there that teach it.

Just like Tai Chi, HSING-I has deep roots in Chinese medicine and the Chinese perceptions of nature. The blows that come from HSING-I come from the five elements of the Chinese - metal, fire, earth, water, and wood. Similar to other forms that originate from Kung Fu, HSING-I offers complex, dance like movements that are adapted from the way animals react and move. Due to the training being so demanding and rigorous, and the breathing exercises being so demanding, those who practice this martial art have astounding physical skills and amazing endurance.

Tai Chi

To those who live outside of China, Tai Chi resembles more of a dance. The slow and calm movements it teaches are balanced and exact, performed while the stylist is in a deep state of relaxation. While in this deep state of relaxation, the stylist will be fully aware of what he is doing and his movements, although he will appear to those around him to be asleep.

In reality, Tai Chi is an energy exercise that promotes strength, stamina, and flexibility. By using the deep state of relaxation, Tai Chi enables stylists to benefit emotionally and spiritually as well. Tai Chi also uses deep states of mediation as well, helping stylists to learn how to reach their high level of peace.

Chinese martial arts

Even though Kung Fu is the best martial art in China, there are many different forms and styles that originate from it. There is the Shaolin style as well, which offers several different styles of Kung Fu as well, including the world famous “5 animals system”. The five animals system is among the most popular in China and well known around the world for their devastating techniques and amazing power when used in combat.

Along with Kung Fu, both HSING-I and Tai Chi are great martial arts that help with endurance training and flexibility. A lot of Kung Fu students in China choose to study one of these arts as well, as it helps to add to their physical and emotional power. Students who study Tai Chi or HSING-I as well as Kung Fu, have a higher state of endurance and spirituality that simply cannot be matched.

All around the world, China is well known for martial arts. China brought Kung Fu and Tai Chi to the world, which is something we are all thankful for. Even though Japan offers their unique blend of martial arts, many consider China to be the founding father of martial arts. The Chinese have been using martial arts for hundreds of years - providing just how dominant it can be as a means of self defense and a way to live your life in a peaceful manner.

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Escrima - the filipino martial art

Escrima is a popular Filipino martial art dating back to the 1500s, during the colonization of the Philippine Islands by the Spanish. Escrima is a very simplified but practical form of combat technique originally designed as a self-defense tool. Escrima is also known by many other names such as Eskrima, Arnis, Arnis de Mano, Kali and FMA (Filipino Martial Art). Because of its effectiveness, Escrima is also taught extensively in many Special Forces including the Navy Seals and Army Special Forces.

Brief History:

Many believe that Escrima or Filipino Martial Art originated from Chinese influenced Indonesian fighting tactics such as Kun Tao, Chuan Fa and Tai Chi double stick forms. Others believe the Escrima art form to be wholly developed by the Filipino people. However, the most plausible explanation seems to be rooted in the history of the Spanish colonization.

When the Spanish occupied the Philippine Islands, a form of art similar to Escrima had already existed but was only recreational. However, this art began to develop into a more martial discipline when the Spanish prohibited indigenous Filipino weapons such as the Bolo (machete), daggers and fighting sticks in the 1700s. It remained a clandestine art until the Americans took over in 1898. From then on, the Filipino Martial Art started to gain recognition and popularity.

In the West, Escrima was introduced and popularized by Filipino immigrants after the Second World War, particularly in the American states of Hawaii and California.

Weapons and Footwork in Escrima:

Unlike other forms of martial arts, the primary tool to learn the basic concepts of Escrima is focus on weaponry, which is followed by empty-hand techniques. The Rattan stick is the most common weapon used in Escrima training, which includes hand and head protection when sparring. Other weapons include burned and hardened stick made of hardwood, such as Molave or Kamagong (ebony). Modern versions may be made out of aluminum, other metals, or high-impact plastics. The Nunchaku (also known as Kung Fu sticks or Double sticks) weapon was popularized by actor Bruce Lee, an avid practitioner of Escrima.

Each range - the distance between opponents - in Escrima has its own characteristics and footwork techniques. Good footwork enables efficient control of these ranges. The footwork is demonstrated in terms of triangles with two feet occupying two corners of the triangle and the step to the third corner. The shape and size of the triangle is dependant on the particular situation.

Escrima Facts:

1. Escrima is mixture of hard (like Karate) and soft (like Tai Chi Ch’uan) styles.

2. Escrima is taught on ideal street-fighting settings without the need for uniforms.

3. Restraining techniques are not focused on but rather on offensive, combat styles.

4. There are no official rankings in Escrima except for titles to recognize seniority of instructors.

5. Most of the power in Escrima is derived from body movement and economy of motion, rather than strength.

6. Escrima is a complete martial art, focusing on weaponry and empty-hand techniques.

7. Escrima provides effective training in sparring against multiple opponents.

An-introduction-to-muay-thai

An Introduction To Muay Thai

All across the world, people have heard about it and possibly even witnessed it first hand or on television - the furious punches, bone crushing elbows, lethal and piercing kicks, and the unforgettable knees. Although watching it on television is great, nothing begins to compare to seeing these moves executed live - with thousands of fans cheering the fighters on.

This is the wonderful world of Muay Thai kickboxing. Muay Thai is a martial art that is unlike any other, rich in the proud heritage of an entire nation. The style is interwoven into the well known history of the Thai people. Even though they are gentle and fun loving people, they’ve had to defend both themselves and their land for many years against the aggressive powers and thieves.

To protect what they had, the Thai people developed a fighting system of close combat techniques that were suited to the type of rough terrain they would be fighting in. Over the years, it eventually become a rite of passage for all Thai men to train in this amazing martial art.

In the beginning, Muay Thai proved to be a dangerous and deadly art, with the fighters having no safety gear or protection - all they had were lengths of cords in which they would wrap around their fists as gloves. As the years progressed, rules were written into the equation to establish some protection for the fighters.

Over the years, Muay Thai has progressed as both a martial art and a style, attracting people from all over the world. There are training facilities in Russia and the United States, with qualified instructors to help teach Muay Thai to interested students.

These days, Muay Thai is one of the most popular sports in the world. There are a lot of television networks that broadcast Thai bouts on a weekly basis, pleasing avid fighting fans from all over the world. International boxing is another popular sport, although most successful International boxers got their start in Muay Thai. This goes to show why Muay Thai training is so popular - and so lethal as well.

Normally, Thai bouts are fought with 5 three minute rounds, with a two minute rest period in between the rounds. All fights are preceded by a dance, which gives the contestants the opportunity to pay homage to their teachers. The dance is an excellent exercise to warm up with, with plenty of symbolic meaning towards the style.

During the fights and even with training, you’ll see that each Thai boxers wears armbands and a headband. The headband that fighters wear is believed to have been blessed by a monk or teacher, and will bestow luck upon the fighter. Thai boxers take a lot of pride in their training and fighting, with the headband being a source of inspiration and pride for the fighter.

During training, Thai fighters will learn a lot about their spiritual well being, the history of Muay Thai, and the skills they need to survive. Fighters that plan to compete in Thai fights will need to practice a lot, as the fights can be very demanding. Thai training can be very brutal, all depending on where you study. If you are studying the ancient arts of Thai boxing, you can count on the training to be very rigorous and demanding.

Although Muay Thai can be a tough art to practice, it is one of the best martial arts that you can study. The techniques are lethal, the training is tough - yet the competitions make it all worth while!

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An-introduction-to-capoeira

An Introduction To Capoeira

The martial art of Capoeira was originally created over 400 years ago in Brazil by the African slaves. This martial art is unlike any of the other martial arts there anywhere in the world, and possesses a blend of power, beauty, mental balance, physical power, music, and an overwhelming sense of art and finesse.

Upon it’s creation, Capoeira proved to the world that it can be practiced by anyone, regardless of size, weight, or age. The style is more than a martial art, but also a social event that is rich in tradition and history. Capoeira is a truly powerful martial art, resembling a collaboration of music, dance, and exotic movements - and even a game.

Those who witness Capoeira games will note the music. Both the music and the lyrics play a big part in the way that the game (known as jogo) is conducted. For the players, there are several different rhythms that call for different speeds. When watching the game played, spectators are normally in awe from the movements. The jogo consists of a circle, with the players in the middle and the musicians at the foot of the circle.

Players that enter the game will enter into the circle, with a spring, cartwheel, or other type of visually stunning movement. Upon entering the circle, players will complete back and forth with various combinations of poetic movements and breathtaking aerial displays. It takes years of practice and hard work to become great at the jogo, as it requires precision, fast movement, and flawless application of the Capoeira techniques.

From a defensive standpoint, Capoeira is flashy, very creative, and also very useful, as the techniques seem to come out of nowhere and can be very hard to defend against. The opponent or attacker has no clue what to expect from the student. The Capoeira student defends himself through the use of dancing movements and acrobatic techniques, executing perfect movements that up until Capoeira were only dreamt of.

Capoeira and the jogo game are really big in Brazil, with hundreds of students learning the martial art. It isn’t one of the most popular in the United States, although it is offered. In South America it is more of a lifestyle, with jogo games being played on a daily basis. A lot of martial arts students don’t want to learn Capoeira for the simple fact that the movements can be a bit of a risk. Once you see how the style is performed, it can make you cringe at any second.

Over the last couple of decades, the art has grown a lot. In 1974, the art of Capoeira became the national sport of Brazil, proving that just about everyone in Brazil had accepted it. As time continues to pass, you can count on more and more competitions and dojo’s to surface - introducing this truly excellent martial art to newer generations.

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How to choose a martial art

Once you’ve decided that you want to start training a martial art, you’ll need to decide which one is best for you. Of course, your choice might be dictated by the schools available in your area, but if you’re lucky you’ll have the choice of at least a few different types. There are many different types of martial arts (and even variations within the basic types) so it’s important to make sure that you research the techniques and features to find the best fit for your lifestyle and needs. This general explanation of the six most popular styles in the United States can help you get started on the decision.

It’s also important to note that there are as many interpretations of the martial arts styles as there are instructors. Students also interpret the class differently than other students in the same class, so other people’s opinions are not always the best determiner of what style you should pursue. While you are trying to find the martial art that’s right for you, it is helpful to also try a few classes to get a feel for the style, instructor and school.

KARATE

History

Karate can be translated as “empty hand” which means that it is a martial art performed without weapons. While the history of Karate is somewhat vague, its ancient roots have been traced back to China in the 5th century B. C. The more modern form of Karate began in Okinawa, Japan during the late 1700s. There was a weapon ban in Okinawa at this time, so people had to come up with system of self defense that used empty hands – they combined aspects of Chinese martial arts with the Te traditional to Okinawa. By the early 1900s it began spreading throughout Japan. In 1964, the Federation of Karate Organizations was formed as a means to create some continuity for Karate world-wide. Even so, there are many different styles and variations of Karate today.

Techniques

Karate is a linear martial art. It uses a wide variety of movements: kicks, punches, blocks, strikes, evasions and throws. Training focuses on having a strong offense and puts equal importance on the three areas of the art: basics, sparring and forms.

Features

• People who practice Karate use their hips to generate power.

• Ranks, values and styles differ from organization to organization.

• Karate, which can be hard and straight line, is very disciplined and some traditional schools might seem very harsh.

AIKIDO

History

Using the influences of the traditional art of Daito Ryo Aikijo-Jitsu, Japanese fencing, spear fighting and Omotokyo, Moriehie Usehiba developed the martial art of Aikido (“the peaceful art”). He first used this name for it in 1942. The basis of this art is to live in a spirit of protection instead of physical domination. The art of Aikido is ruled by the International Aikido Federation in Tokyo, Japan.

Techniques

Aikido is a circular martial art. Instead of winning a fight with physical domination, Aikido teaches its participants to control and redirect the negative energy. This leads to a commitment to both peaceful resolutions of conflict as well as self-improvement through training. People who practice Aikido learn to use throws and pins as well as how to immobilize their attackers. They don’t use punches and kicks, except as a distraction. The basis of the art is to learn how to stay out of the line of attack and gain control of the attacker’s balance in order to stop the attacker.

Features

• Aikido does use weapons: jo (a 4-5 foot long staff), Bokken (a wooden sword) and a Tanto (a wooden knife).

• Aikido is a non-violent method of self-defense.

• The quality of the belt ranks is strictly regulated.

• Aikido lacks many of the kicks and strikes common to other martial arts.

JUDO

History

Dr. Jigro Kano developed Judo after he was enrolled at Tenjin Shinyo ryo School of Ju-Jitsu because he was frustrated with all of the student injuries. Judo is a gentle martial art that helps its participants strive to perfect themselves and to be a value to society. Judo, which means “the gentle way”, improves physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health.

Techniques

Judo uses throwing, grappling, pins, holds, locks and choking. However, the training focuses on safety – participants need to work towards top conditioning and Judo is always practiced on mats. Judo participants learn the art through a series of forms that consist of throwing and sparring – there are no strikes in competitive Judo.

Features

• Judo has a strict set of rules and a clear instructional sequence.

• Judo rules, training and ranks are fairly standardized throughout the world.

• Judo helps develop complete body control, fine balance and fast reflexes.

• Judo uses a lot of grappling, throws, grabbing and ground work. Because of this, it often reminds people of wrestling.

TAEKWONDO

History

While the beginnings of Taekwondo can be traced as far back as 30 B. C., modern Taekwondo began after Korea was liberated in 1945. Koreans wanted to eradicate all Japanese influence on martial arts, so they began connecting the Korean martial arts schools and styles to create a national sport. The name Taekwondo (“the way of the hand and foot”) was chosen in 1965. 1973 marks the beginning of the World Taekwondo Federation. It became a part of the Olympics in 2000.

Techniques

Taekwondo consists of four disciplines including patterns, sparring, self-defense and a break test. Taekwondo is primarily a kicking art and there is a large emphasis on sport. People who train Taekwondo need to combine philosophy, mental and physical discipline and ability to their training.

Features

• Taekwondo is recognizable by its high kicks.

• Taekwondo black belts exams require a break test.

• Taekwondo training can include the use of vital points to attack an enemy.

• Taekwondo schools are often kid - and sport - oriented.

• Taekwondo students often are expected to compete in many tournaments.

T’AI CHI

History

The development of T’ai Chi (translated as “the supreme ultimate”) is credited to Chang San-feng, but Wang Chung-yueh and Chiang Fa elaborated on the original art. They took San-feng’s 13 postures and devised continuous sequences that linked them together. T’ai Chi used to be a greatly defensive art – even deadly. So much so, that the families who knew it guarded it fiercely. Now, T’ai Chi is less violent and is used to get rid of more figurative enemies such as stress and fatigue.

Techniques

People who practice T’ai Chi may use weapons, but the underlying theory is that the art is used to unify the mind, body and spirit. It is often now used to guide negative energy away from oneself. There are two ways to practice T’ai Chi. The long form can take 30 minutes or more while the short form can take less than 10 minutes. The forms focus on continuous movement that leads to relaxation and solid stances. In T’ai Chi, each arm is used to protect half of the body and the hands never reach past the toes. T’ai Chi can be done alone (forms) or with a partner (self-defense training).

Features

• T’ai Chi teaches awareness of balance and what affects it in oneself and in others.

• T’ai Chi has five major styles, but there are always new ones developing.

• The basis of T’ai Chi’s self defense is to meet force and stick with it until can be redirected instead of resisting it.

• T’ai Chi focuses on slow movements, so people who like vigorous exercise often find this martial art to be boring and slow.

KUNG FU

History

Kung Fu (translated as “skill and effort”) actually refers to over 200 styles of martial arts (most of which stem from Chinese martial arts). Kung fu can be traced back to the shoalin temples where the monks used it for health and spiritual developments as well as a method of self defense. During the early 1900s, Kung Fu, also called Wu Shu, spread throughout China when fighting arts became very popular. In the 1960s and ‘70s Kung Fu’s popularity grew due to the Bruce Lee movies.

Techniques

Kung Fu is central to the Chinese culture and is used both for physical wellness and artistic expressions. Within the many different styles of Kung Fu, there are variations from hard and linear to soft and circular in technique. Some use weapons (including the common sword, saber, spear and cudgel) and others do not. The seemingly common thread through them all, however, is to teach the students to respect the teacher and other Kung Fu styles. Kung Fu also requires (as well as builds) mental strength in addition to physical strength to be successfully practiced. Kung Fu students also often practice some techniques individually and others with groups. In many schools, beginning training starts with what is called the Southern Fist style. It involves footwork, kicks and hand combat techniques.

Features

• Kung Fu refers to the hundreds of different styles of martial arts in China.

• People who practice Kung Fu learn many different fighting techniques including fist fighting, weapon fighting, routines and combats.

• Many Kung Fu styles use similar principals such as, proper diet, and breathing, concentration and meditation exercises.

• Some Kung Fu styles use weapons while others do not.

• Kung Fu training improves physical conditioning through strengthening of the joints and increases speed and reactions.

• Kung Fu’s major difference over other martial arts is that it not only focuses on outer, physical power, but also involves training the mind and inner power through breathing exercises and meditation.

I hope you find this information useful. I wish that I could cover all of the styles that I left out, but it would take an entire book to do that. If you have any questions about which style would be best for you, please feel free to call or email me.

Sincerely,

Robert Jones

Master Instructor

The Academy of Kempo Martial Arts

Training with martial arts weapons - karate kung fu weaponry

There are opportunities in martial arts training to learn to use various martial arts weapons. Many martial arts schools, especially those that teach Japanese karate and Chinese kung fu styles have weaponry as part of their overall curriculum. Popular weapons from karate systems include the bo staff, kama, sai, sword, nunchaku and tonfa. Chinese kung fu styles have broadsword, 3 section staff, kwan do, whip chain, butterfly knives as well as their own versions of staff. Of course, there are many other types of weapons in martial arts but the above are the more common ones taught. Some of the more exotic weapons include the fan, rope dart and the hook swords. Martial arts weapons can be divided into short and long range. An example of a short range weapon would be a pair of sai. The bo staff would be a long range weapon because of the longer reach. Weapons can also be divided into bladed and non-bladed. Kamas and swords of course would be bladed weapons where staffs and nunchakus would be non-bladed. In most training situations with bladed weapons, the blades are not live. That is, the blades of swords and kamas are blunt rather than sharp. This adds to the safety aspect of martial arts weapons training. Weapons can also come in different weights from heavy traditional models down to ultra light weight versions for forms competition.

Martial arts weapons are considered as extensions of a martial artist’s own body. For example, strikes with a weapon are really extended hand strikes. Blocks with weapons are modeled after traditional martial art blocking techniques. Therefore, it is important for martial arts students to be relatively proficient with martial arts techniques using their own bodies first before learning to use any martial arts weapon. This will help the students understand the applications behind each weapons technique much better. In most Japanese karate schools, weapons training won’t be offered until students reach an intermediate level such as green or blue belt. There are martial arts that are strictly weapons oriented. An example is Japanese kendo which is modeled after samarai sword fighting. Philipino arnis is stick fighting which was developed in the South Pacific islands.

There are many benefits in training with martial arts weapons. Because most weapons have some weight to them, their use will help develop muscle tone and strength. Performing forms or katas with weapons will also develop coordination. In today’s world, martial arts weapons may not be as practical as the days of the past when it was acceptable to carry weapons wherever one traveled. However, with some understanding of weapons techniques, a martial artist today can turn almost any household item such as an umbrella, cane or even a set of keys into weapons of self defense if required. Another important point that shouldn’t be ignored is that most practitioners will claim that training with martial arts weapons is a lot of fun.

However, not all martial arts clubs and studios will teach weapons. Many tae kwon do schools for example do not include weapons in their overall training. This is not to say that Korean martial arts do not have weapons. The Korean martial art kuk sool won features the staff, sword and cane. So if a martial arts student wishes to learn the use of weapons, a school that includes them in their training should be sought after. Another alternative for students who are otherwise happy with their martial arts club that doesn’t have weapons training is to get supplementary private instruction from instructors who can provide it.

Weapons training can open up a whole new dimension to overall martial arts training. Even advanced tai chi practitioners use swords in some of their forms. It doesn’t matter if sometimes the swords are made entirely of wood either since the actual weapons techniques will still be used in the forms. For many martial arts competitors, weapons forms are their favorite divisions to compete in. From a spectator point of view, weapons forms can be very exciting to watch especially when weapons such as whip chains or kamas with strings are used since their presentations are so dynamic and even somewhat dangerous to the user. Such weapons have caused injuries to users when certain techniques were sloppy or mistimed. But like other aspects of martial arts, proficiency with a martial art weapon after much hard training can bring a high sense of satisfaction to a martial artist.

Eight tips for selecting a martial arts studio

The main reason most people drop out of the martial arts -- besides life taking them in different directions -- is because they didn't take the time to do any research and found out later the studio they joined wasn't what they expected.

The time you invest researching studios will pay you back a thousand fold. It will also help you find the right studio for you. You'll be more enthusiastic about your training and you'll get more out of it.

Here are eight consumer tips to help you make a more informed decision before starting at any martial arts studio:

1. Belt Rank Isn’t Everything. Just because an instructor is a high ranking black belt doesn’t automatically mean they’re a good instructor. What’s important is if they can help you reach your goals and teach you what you want to learn.

2. Size of Studio. Quality of instruction can vary from studio to studio no matter its size or what they teach. A larger studio may have more convenient hours, but may not offer you the personalized instruction you’re looking for that a smaller studio may provide.

3. Watch a Class. Don’t overlook this step. This will tell you more about the studio than anything - especially when you show up unannounced. Most public studios welcome walk-ins.

4. Visit Several Studios. Just because a studio is close, doesn’t make it the best place for you train. Wouldn’t you rather train at a place Five or ten minutes further away if it better matched your needs? Visit at least three places before deciding just to be sure.

5. Talk to Students. Students will tell all. They will tell you what to expect and why they decided to train there. This may help you make a better, more informed appraisal of the studio and its instructors.

6. Read the Fine Print. Not all studios require a contract, but if they do, pay particular attention to the terms of any contract and make sure you fully understand your rights before signing on the dotted line.

7. Ask Questions. Don’t be worried that you will offend the instructor because you look for clarification. If an instructor or studio owner doesn’t answer your questions to your satisfaction, then maybe you should move on to the next studio.

8. Try Before You Buy. If the studio you’re interested in offers a trial program, it is recommended you take it. This will tell you a lot about how you will be taught and what you can expect from the studio.

The-art-of-tai-chi

The Art Of Tai Chi

Tai Chi is an ancient martial art, one that was practiced for centuries in China as an exercise, a martial art, and a way to improve the internal flow of energy in the body. It emphasis correct form and feeling with each and every movement, which is why it is always taught to be practiced in a slow and gentle fashion.

By involving the entire body with little to no impact, Tai Chi promotes strength, flexibility, and stamina. With the entire body being taught to move as a whole, Tai Chi cultivates the link among the mind and the body, helping to enhance one’s coordination and balance. It can also help with the joints as well, especially if an individual is very stiff in the joints.

Although it was developed to be a martial art, it involves very little striking, offensive, or even defense techniques. Tai Chi is a movement and breathing art that works all of the major muscles and joints in the body, helping to circulate internal energy, or chi. The Chinese believe that internal energy, or chi is what prevents or stops diseases.

When practicing the art, the body will remain very soft and relaxed, just like it was suspended from the top of the head with the joints being similar to that of a puppet. The mind of the student is focused on each movement, focusing on the flow of energy. By being relaxed and focused, you allow the energy to flow through your entire body.

Even though you are soft and relaxed, you are still constantly moving. The energy that flows through your body never stops, it keeps you moving. When you move in reality, it takes little to no energy to make a movement. By using your chi, everything you do seems as if it is weightless.

In combat, the Tai Chi student uses his opponent’s energy against him. The stylist is very relaxed, believing that the energy of the opponent can be used against him. There is little to no strength involved. When the opponent becomes weak and tires himself out - the stylist attacks. This way, there is very little energy left for defense or even attacking.

Tai Chi is one of the oldest styles of martial arts, and one of the hardest to find these days. Just like other martial arts, such as Tiger Claw and Ninjutsu, it can be very hard to find a dojo that teaches the art. If you can find a dojo that teaches the art of Tai Chi, you really shouldn’t pass it up. It can teach you a lot about internal energy and your spiritual well being - learning more about yourself than you ever thought possible in the process.

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I don t know much about martial arts except

My only experience in the martial arts was a three week long experiement with kung fu. I went to the class to see what it was like and to learn about the thing that took many of my friends captive on every Tuesday and Thursday night. I cautiously entered the Chinese restaurant with my friends and proceeded into the basement where the class was held. I was not fond of the huge mirrors lining the longest wall, but I didn't mind the incense sticks that burned in little holders around all four edges of the room. It didn't take me long, however, to learn that martial arts wasn't for me.

My little bout with martial arts taught me a lot about myself and a lot about martial arts. In all honesty, I expected to arrive at kung fu class and find it to be easy and mindless. I would soon learn that kung fu, like all of the martial arts, requires a level of strength and discipline that I could only dream of possessing. Each person in our class came prepared to work hard and to do this they left the troubles of their lives at the door. Entering the martial arts room meant entering a new world for them. A world that required everything and more that they had to give.

Martial arts isn't for the physically weak, that is for sure. I left feeling pretty confident after attending my first class. It wasn't until the next morning when each step I took sent shooting pain in every direction of my body that I realized the level of torture I had done to my body. My kung fu friends said that this level of pain was normal and that eventually my body would get used to the hard workouts and it wouldn't hurt so badly. Unfortunately, my three weeks of staggering pain were enough for me and I never made it beyond the pain stage. Sure, I had experienced pain from sports or tough workouts before, but no pain that compared to the pain I received from an hour of martial arts.

Everyone I know who sticks with the martial arts really loves it. I guess bodies begin to crave the strength and discipline that the martial arts require and so the workouts become something to anticipate rather than dread. My friends who have continued with the martial arts have developed this amazing sense of mental fortitude as well. They are able to make it through not only the hardness that the martial arts bring but also through any hardship life presents. Their classes are a training ground that teaches them to press on and endure all that happens in life.

So, while I never stuck with the martial arts long enough to fully understand them, the things I took away from my three weeks of kung fu are lessons I will continue to ponder for a long time.

Three steps to picking a karate studio

If you are like me, you are looking to get in a little better shape. What better way to do that than to start taking up martial arts. There are literally hundreds of different types of martial arts styles, and you want to make sure that you are getting a good deal on your karate lessons. Karate studios vary in quality, and unless you know what you are doing it might not get the best deal available. There are hundreds if not hundreds of thousands of karate instructors and their quality varies widely. Let's take a look at three different tips to keep in mind when shopping for a karate studio.

1. How long. This might not seem obvious at first, but the length of time that a karate studio has been in existence is more important than you would think? Why is that? Because many karate studios are like restaurants. People who open restaurants generally are good cooks, and maybe not the best business people. Just because you're an Olympic athlete doesn't mean you are a good business person. So what if a karate studio is brand new, the odds of its staying around for a long time, are fairly low. But if the karate studio has been around for a little while. You might be a lot safer, signing a long-term contract with them.

2. Instructor. Who is the instructor? Is he or she a well-known name? Is in a chain of karate studios? The instructor makes all the difference. Finding a good instructor is like finding a nugget of gold. The good ones are hard to find, but when you find them, you should really stick to them. Ask the instructor or what his qualifications are and how long he's been practicing karate. A little legwork goes a long way.

3. Location. Is the karate studio close your house? Is it easy to access? What are the hours? Find out all this before hand. You don't want to be driving hours just to take a karate lesson here and there. While close is better, if a really good instructor is a little out-of-the-way, that might be a good way to go too

This is just the tip of the iceberg. Come by our site and learn all about karate today.

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Martial arts helping your children protect themselves

Did you know that a child is reported abducted or missing every 40 seconds in the United States and that most potential abductors make their first contact with the children they abduct within one quarter of a mile from their homes? With summer approaching and children having more time to play with friends during the day, it is now more important than ever to start (or continue) giving your children the tools they need to protect themselves:

Never leave young children unattended anywhere and have older children practice a buddy system with their peers. Teach your children their full name, your name, your address and telephone number. Teach them how to dial and use 911 or your equivalent emergency number. Teach your children about strangers, to never talk to strangers and to never go near strangers.

Give your children the confidence, strength, skills and mental awareness they need to defend themselves if they ever find that they are in a shady situation with either a stranger or someone they know – enroll them in a martial arts class. It can make all the difference. Training martial arts can give your children four important skills that will not only help them defend themselves against a possible abduction, but will also help them in other areas of their lives. Read on to find out more:

Martial Arts Increases Confidence. Martial arts can help your children increase their confidence by giving them the skills and practice needed to get in tune with their minds and bodies They will begin to not only understand their actions and options, but themselves as a whole. Martial arts training also gives children the skills and abilities they need to know that they can defend themselves if the need arises and this confidence in their abilities carries over into all aspects of their lives. Confidence in themselves and their lives help them become less likely to fall prey to the convincing persuasions of potential abductors. Confident children appear to be (and are) strong individuals and are less likely to become victims of all forms of violent acts.

Martial Arts Increase Strength. Martial arts training use the entire body during each and every session. This means that when practicing martial arts, your children will be conditioning their entire bodies to become stronger and more physically fit. If they are physically fit, they increase their chances of fighting off or getting away from a potential abductor. Furthermore, regular physical exercise can help decrease the chances of obesity, diabetes and heart disease in your children.

Martial Arts Teach Self-Defense Skills. Rest assured, martial arts training doesn’t focus on combat and fighting. It does, however, teach skills that your children can use for self-defense should the need arise. The various skills taught in martial arts can give your children the knowledge they need to handle many situations and the peace of mind you need to know that your children are trained to protect themselves.

Martial Arts Improve Mental Awareness. Training martial arts is not a mindless activity. It requires complete concentration and focus at all time during training. This concentration will also carry over to all parts of your children’s lives to help them be more aware of themselves and their surroundings. They will be less likely to just “zone out” and be caught off guard in a potentially harmful situation.

If you are interested in learning more about how martial arts can help your self confidence, please contact one of my three locations in Bellevue, Lynnwood or Kent, Washington at 800-508-6141or [email protected] com to set up a free 2 week trail orientation.

Also, please see our web pages at www. kungfutemple. com and www. martialarts-instruction. com

Sincerely,

Robert Jones

Master Instructor

6th Degree Black Belt

Owner, the Academy of Kempo Martial Arts

Mixed martial arts-learn the terms

With the rules and sanctioning of certain mma events there has been an explosion of new followers of mma (mixed martial arts) The purpose of this article is to help familiarize the new fans of this sport with some of the terms that are used. If you have a basic understanding with some of the terminology you will find viewing the sport more enjoyable. Keep in mind that this description is not inclusive of every aspect, but more of a guide for the beginner.

Submissions: submissions are techniques that cause the receiver to give up due to pain being applied to a joint or strangulation from a choke. Here are some of the basics.

Kimura: A shoulder lock that applies pressure to the shoulder joint.

Rear Naked Choke: A choke that apples strangulation to both sides of the neck (both arteries) it also impedes breathing.

Guillotine Choke: This is where the defender reaches underneath the attacer's neck and applies upward pressure, with the attackers head under the defender’s armpit. It is usually applied when an attacker attempts a takedown and the defender is able to capture the neck.

Triangle Choke: The attacker is between the defender’s legs on the ground. The defender gets an attackers arm between his own neck and the defender’s leg. The defender then places his ankle behind his knee of his other leg and secures the choke.

Arm Triangle: Similar to the Triangle Choke except arms are used instead of legs. Usually executed from a top or back position.

Arm Bar: When an opponent is able to secure an arm and straighten it out with pressure underneath the elbow.

Knee Bar: Same as an arm bar but causes pain to the joint of the knee.

Ankle Lock: A submission that causes pain to the joint of the ankle or Achilles tendon.

There are way too many techniques to list in this article but these are a lot of the main ones you will hear mentioned. There are also several “control” positions. Here are a few;

Full Mount: This is when an attacker is on top of his opponent with both of his legs on either side of the defender. A bad spot to be in because the attacker can rise up and deliver strikes.

Half Mount: The attacker has only one leg on the outside and the defender is holding the attacker’s other leg between his legs to stop the attacker from achieving a full mount.

Side Mount: The attacker is perpendicular to the defender across the defender’s chest. A transfer to full mount or submission can be accomplished.

North/South: An opponent is on top of the other facing opposite directions.

The sport of mma is an elite sport with various strategies and techniques. Here are a few more terms you might hear.

Ground And Pound: A fighter takes down an opponent, mounts him, and delivers strikes until knock out, referee stoppage, or the defending fighter gives up (taps)

Take Down: A fighter attempts to bring his opponent down to the mat for a submission or to deliver strikes from the mount.

Tap Out: When a fighter taps on the other fighter or the mat to concede the fight. Mostly done when a submission is applied. (kind of like saying uncle.)

This article is not a “catch all” for every term you might here during an mma fight. It will give you a better understanding of the sport and make it a lot more fun to watch.

The history of karate

The history of Karate is a long and meandering path of development, across seas from Japan and Okinawa, through the heart of long-ago China and over the mountains into ancient India.

For many karateka training in a traditional, style, there is a certain satisfaction in making a connection to the past through training as their predecessors trained (or close to it) and, by observing tradition, carrying on values and practices still considered useful and important. But what is traditional? Through the ages, martial arrs undergo many changes: they adapt to new circumstances, they branch-off and are altered, they are lead by new people. Others die with their inheritors. In the end, what we have may be likened to the message in a game of Chinese whispers; altered from its origins by so many people that any obvious links to its beginnings may be hard to find.

The many stories that make up karate's history have not escaped the Chinese-whisper syndrome. Modern karate's origins have been the subject of research and debate for so long that the history of karare now has its own history! This is partly because unearthing karate's earliest predecessors requires mapping the entire history of the martial arts in the East.

Many know Okinawa, an island 550 kilometres south of the Japanese mainland, as the birthplace of karate. But let's look first to Japan, considered home to most karate systems existing today. Karate is now practised in an estimated 120 countries and takes many forms. Of these, some of the most famous were founded in Japan after World War II, prominent examples being Mas Oyama's Kyokushin and Choiro Tani's Shukokai. At the same time in Okinawa, the dominant schools (Ryu) were Shorin-Ryu, Goju-Ryu, Uechi-Ryu and Matsubayashi-Ryu. Although there had been karate demonstrations outside Japan in the late 1920s and '30s, it was in the post-war years that karate arrived in European and Western countries like Australia. The Japan Karate Association, formed in 1948, assisted in spreading karate world-wide.

The many styles that developed inside Japan all grew from various Okinawan karate systems introduced to Japan early in the 20th century. Around 1902, karate was added to Okinawan schools' physical education programs and the secrecy that had surrounded the art lessened. However, some changes were made to kata for the purpose of teaching children and giving public demonstrations, and it is said this contributed to the loss of some knowledge concerning kata bunkai (applications) and thus the hiding of some of karate's deadliest defences.

Shuri-te karate master Anko Itosu (1830-1915) pioneered this development and, though not alone, his student Funakoshi Gichin is the Okinawan most often credited with the establishment of karate in Japan. In the early '20s, Funakoshi impressed Japan's Crown Prince with a karate demonstration and his art was later given support by Judo's famous founder, Jigaro Kano, securing karate's acceptance by the Japanese.

Many Japanese held racist attitudes toward things Chinese or Okinawan, so these events were vital for Karate's growth. The Okinawan's originally called Kara? te tou-di, meaning China-hand. 'Hand' is a literal translation of te or di, which was used to describe Okinawa's fighting arts just as the Chinese used the word for fist. To help karate blend into Japanese culture, the character tou was changed to a Japanese one meaning empty, hence we now have kara-te-do, 'the way of the empty hand'.

From there, Kenwa Mabuni founded Shito-Ryu (1928), and Chojun Miyagi established Goju-Ryu (1930). Funakoshi founded Shotokan in 1938 and Hironori Otsuka blended jiu-jitsu with karate (learned from Funakoshi) to form Wado-Ryu in 1939. Universities in Tokyo and Osaka formed karate clubs and the art of Okinawan China-hand soon became Japanese. The Butokukai, Japan's top combat-arts organisation, also helped Japanise karate, creating standards for teaching and developing ways to competitively test the arts. These were the beginnings of sport-karate.

The various Okinawan karate schools had always been scattered and disorganised, divided into closely guarded regional and family groups (much like the arts of China). Many styles existed but the primary three schools were all concentrated in a small area of southern Okinawa and named after their towns of origin: Naha, a town of merchants, Shuri, home to royalty, and Tomari, inhabited by farmers and fishermen. Variation between the styles is partly attributed to the distinct influences of these different classes of society.

Shuri-te featured long, low stances and an offensive approach, considered derivative of Shaolin Temple kung fu, while Naha-te is considered the most Chinese, incorporating hard and soft methods, breathing techniques and ki, (Chi or vital energy) control. Tomari-te (which focused on using the arms) developed from these two and together they were the basis for the Japanese styles; Naha-te became Goju-Ryu and Shorin-Ryu is a product of both Naha-te and Shuri-te. From the Goju and Shorin schools emerged Shito-Ryu, and so on.

The facts concerning Okinawa's sources of martial arts influence are often vague and unverifiable, some say because WWII bombs have destroyed much of the evidence. Still, aside from the continual development of self-defence methods among Okinawans, it is accepted that Chinese martial arts have most greatly influenced present-day karate. In fact, Chojun Miyagi said a style of kung fu that arrived in 1828 was "the source" of Goju-Ryu.

This passage of combat knowledge from China is closely linked to a book of Chinese origin called the Bubishi, the subject of Kyoshi Patrick McCarthy's book, The Bible of Karate. Published sometime during China's Qing dynasty (1644-1911), it details Chinese kung fu history, technique and philosophy. It's believed the Bubishi was written by a White Crane boxer, Fang Qiniang, the daughter of an Eighteen Monk Fist kung fu stylist who escaped the destruction of the Shaolin Temple by government forces (Shaolin was known to house and train revolutionaries) and settled in Fujian, China. Both feature in the Bubishi, as do their systems. This book was kept secret and hand-copied by generations of Okinawan masters; Funakoshi's books even contain chapters taken directly from the Bubishi.

McCarthy's extensive research exposed 10 more-or-less plausible theories as to who brought the Bubishi to Okinawa. Featured among them are some Okinawan masters who trained in China, including Uechi-Ryu founder Uechi Kanbun, who studied Shaolin Tiger kung fu in Fuzhou around 1897. Yet, while the Bubishi is of great importance to Okinawan karate, it did not arrive in Okinawa until sometime in the 1800s and was preceded by many more influential exchanges.

Common folklore tells of karate's development by downtrodden peasants, their weapons confiscated by Japanese invaders, who developed secret fighting traditions while their rulers slept. Legend has it that this is why karate gis look like pyjamas: because they once were, and the tradition has carried on. However, these romantic origins are considered unrealistic by most historians, as Okinawan combative traditions go back much further.

In the 800 years between 600 and 1400 A. D., Okinawa experienced territorial fighting under the rule of warrior-chieftans and in the 10th century military power struggles in Japan saw some warrior clans move to Okinawa. From 794 to 1185, Japan's methods of war were introduced, including grappling, swordsmanship and other weapon-arts.

Okinawa's regional warring continued until 1429, when the rival groups came under one rule as the Ryukyu Kingdom. In 1507, feudalism (a system whereby peasants farmed for a wealthy lord and fought in his army) was abolished and private ownership of weapons was outlawed. This, says Kyoshi McCarthy, "explains why the Uchinanchu [Okinawans] began intensively cultivating an unarmed means of self-defence".

So, long before karate was exported from Okinawa to Japan, the Japanese were bringing their own combative arts to Okinawa. However, Chinese kung fu's influence was more recent and is more evident in the Okinawan karate that exists today. Again, there are many theories explaining how it got there.

Okinawa established trade with China during the Ming Dynasty and by 1393, a group of Chinese referred to as the 36 Families was settled in Naha, Okinawa. There, Okinawans were taught Chinese language, culture and, it is assumed, martial arts. During this period, Okinawan students also travelled to China to study and possibly learn martial arts. Another likely source are the sapposhi (representatives of the Chinese Emperor) who, in the 1400s, came to Okinawa for months at a time with many multi-skilled people in tow, including security experts. The Chinese kung fu that arrived in Okinawa, possibly by one or all of these means, was then used to police the island. After 1509, with even government officials barred from carrying weapons, these civil-defence methods went underground, but were secretly practised and developed by the middle-level samurai class known as pechin, whose responsibilities included law-enforcement. In 1609 Japan's Satsuma clan captured the Ryukyu Kingdom and until Okinawa became part of Japan in 1879, eclectic fighting traditions grew. Due to the weapon bans, kobudo evolved through Okinawans making use of domestic and farming implements instead, of which the sai is an example (it is said to have once been a hay-fork).

Some pechin also visited Satsuma and learned the Jigen-Ryu ken-jitsu of the Satsuma samurai; it is thought that the six-foot staff techniques of Okinawan kobudo originated there. One example is Matsumura Sokon, an important figure in Shuri-te who was a security agent for various Ryukyuan kings and studied martial arts in Satsuma and Fujian, China.

But to fully explore the origins of China-hand, one must look to China. Most brief histories of karate begin with the legend of the Indian monk Daruma (in Japanese) or Bodhidharma, generally described as a skilled martial artist born into a warrior caste. He travelled to China around the Sixth Century AD to spread Zen Buddhism, settling at the Shaolin monastery to teach Buddhist meditation and philosophy, and physical movements that included striking - the alleged beginnings of the kung fu systems mentioned so far.

However, there is evidence of strong warrior traditions existing in China long before the arrival of Daruma (the first emperor to unify China, Qin Shi Huang, for example, left terracotta replicas of his entire army in Xi'an in 210 BC). It could also be logically concluded that fighting methods and traditions existed to an extent in all human societies, just as surely as quarrels and aggression existed. Texts discovered in China, reportedly 4,000 years old, detail systematic physical training, while 2,800 year-old writings describing unarmed combat have also been found in Europe. That aside, the previously mentioned systems of Monk Fist and White Crane kung fu can be traced to Shaolin.

While it is uncertain how much of Daruma's story is true, the legend is strong and there is little doubt that the texts and exercises introduced to Shaolin have been influential there. However, there have since been many other developments in the kung fu of Shaolin, with various influences flowing into and out from the Temples, leading to the creation of many different styles.

Keeping in mind that traditions are ever-changing, the predecessors of Shaolin martial arts are not necessarily the true origin of karate, just as one person in a game of Chinese whispers has only a small influence on what is whispered at the end of the line. Due to Okinawa's location (just 740 kilometres east of China and 550 north of Taiwan) it attracted the attention of pilgrims, traders and pirates of many races and has therefore had centuries of cultural exchange with Korea, Laos, Cambodia and numerous other Asian cultures with martial traditions. Some karate historians even say that the need for Okinawa's sailors to protect themselves against pirates played a part in the development of Okinawan te, which has existed in various forms for at least 1,000 years.

Despite the focus of Japanese martial traditions on weaponry and grappling during the periods that Okinawa was most exposed to them, their influence on Okinawan karate and kobudo should not be discounted either. So, to provide a complete history of today's karate, it would be wise to also include the history of all Japanese martial arts. That, however, would be another story entirely!

A good analogy for the history of karate might be that no child is born of only one parent; they will therefore have four grandparents, eight great-grandparents, and so on. It can be said that all karate systems in existence today are the descendants of many different parents, each with unique genes but also similarities, evidence of shared ancestors somewhere in their lineage.

That said, it is well worth digging around for the many great individual stories that make up the history of karate. Some of us might also benefit from researching a history that is more personal, immediate and accessible: what of your teacher, his life and his art? Who has he trained with, in what systems? How has karate affected him, and he it? And what of his teacher?

Although the past is often more wondrous than any prediction of the future, historians uncover it not only out of curiosity; their common aim, it is often said, is to learn about the present from the events of history. So, by uncovering your instructors' karate history, you should learn much that will help you on your own journey. You may also choose to learn from the history presented in this article and write it down carefully for future generations.

Everything you need to know about judo uniforms

Since it was created in 1882 by Kano Jigoro of Japan, Judo has become one of the most popular martial arts in the world. It is quite a rigorous and physically demanding sport, appearing in several major international sports competitions. As a result, when partaking in judo training, it is important that a high quality judo uniform, or gi in Japanese, be worn to avoid tearing and damage.

Judo uniforms are generally constructed out of 100% cotton, bleached white. Cotton is the best choice for breathability. Care should be taken when laundering, as most judo uniforms are not pre-shrunken and will shrink up to a full size from excess heat. Therefore, washing in cool water and air drying is highly recommended to avoid shrinkage.

There are three pieces to the judo uniform: the jacket, the belt, and the pants. The jacket is quilted with a thick pliable collar and wide sleeves. Two short splits are on either side of the hip, which are reinforced with extra cloth. The jacket is secured with a belt, coloured according to level, wrapped tightly around the body and knotted. The pants feature an elasticized drawstring waist with wide legs to allow for movement. In areas where there may be a lot of friction or stress from pulling, reinforcement at the seams and additional padding is vital to prevent damage. These include the shoulders, collar, knees, and crotch of the pants.

The cloth for gi's comes in a variety of weights and textures. For training purposes, judo uniforms are made out of single weave cloth. The appropriate weight for a Judoka (Judo practitioner) is measured in ounces or grams, and depends on their ability and age. Usually, beginners at a younger age opt for lighter weights while older advanced students and instructors choose heavier ones. Weights can vary from 7 ounces or 198.44 grams to 40.57 ounces or 1150 grams.

For competitions, double weave cloth is ideal for judo uniforms, making them thicker and heavier. Judo uniforms for competition use tend to be more durable, and as a result, much more expensive than single weave. While training judo uniforms come in white, competition level uniforms also come in blue.

Higher quality judo uniforms should not weigh down the practitioner and restrict their movement. They should fit loosely and comfortably on the body.

What to do if someone wants to fight you

PHYSICAL COMPETANCE

Have you ever seen raw violence or someone getting 'owned'? Just search google for "martial street fights" - "martial owned" Watch those movies and cringe!!!

Kung Fu, Boxing, dancing, balley, incompetance? What will you display to your attacker if that day comes?

Can you throw a punch or even stand steady on one leg? can you do a round-house or even give a kick to the knee? Ever heard of a combination, technique or form?

Today we are lazy, probably fat too.. Go look in the mirror and skip for ten minutes, then check your image again and what do you see?

I can judge I am probably half the strength and endurance form 10 years ago, how about you?

MARTIAL KNOWLEDGE

a martial art is defined as - 1 : of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior 2 : relating to an army or to military life 3 : experienced in or inclined to war : WARLIKE

a martial art is defined as: various styles of self-defense, usually weaponless, based on techniques developed in ancient China, India, and Tibet.

The term 'Kung Fu' does not relate to any specific form of martial art, but rather translates as 'talent' or 'aptitude'.

Wu Shu is traditionally the term popularly used to describe the traditional Chinese martial arts, though other descriptions akin to Kuo-shu, Kuo-chi, Chien-shu and Tao-fa have also been used occasionally. (Wu Shu is the term of late used for Chinese martial arts by the People's Republic of China).

If you’ve never studied a martial art, your awareness of them most likely starts at Bruce Lee movies and ends with the stylized theatrics of The Matrix. If that’s the case, you may not realize from what you’ve gleaned onscreen that there are an estimated 200 unique kinds of martial arts, and within these, thousands of different styles. Karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do are among the most popular and well-known of the martial arts in the U. S., but there are numerous others.

Despite the array of martial arts and styles, most of them share common techniques, and so they can be organized into broad categories that facilitate understanding. The primary way of classifying martial arts is by the basic physical technique they use: striking or grappling.

Because karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do have been more prominent than other forms in popular culture, from film to sporting events, many people mistakenly believe that all martial arts are Asian in origin. In fact, diverse cultures throughout history from Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East have also given birth to their own martial art forms.

Or a combination of triangles with small circles as can be seen in chinese trapping, wrist locks or Aikido entry and endings.

Do you even know the diffference between kung fu and karate? Do you think wing chun is a chinese dish?

The different styles can even be related to shapes or geometry - squares, triangles and circles.

MARTIAL TRAINING TO LIVE

Training is hard..really hard. The most hard is to get started and its down-hill easy from there. What you need is a martial arts machine - something new and exciting to get you off your fat ass.

Everyone knows someone who knows how to fight - with fists, knives, weapons, guns, tactical, sensless, whatever but START!

Or find a martial arts school in your area.

GO to the local phone book and look up kung fu or karate. Then give them a call, go along or take your kid.

Whats important now is to do something, start with brief excercise, get into stretching, shadow box, then step up and train hard.

ITS DANGEROUS OUT THERE

Its dangerous out there and especially for you..

The enemy may be next door and you dont know it but you got to have the guts too look. What can you really do once you see some violence or get scared or worse because you receive a bashing or king hit - do you hide in your house?

TV today scares the shiit out of many people as it promotes violence and turns the meek yellow and nervous.

The danger today is maybe not too obvious to you but you better hone your sensors or youll get hit without seeing it coming.

You know that given a situation to be a hero and stop a crime, terrorism or violence you'll be able to step up or chase after them etc - or maybe you'll cower or be the victim.

Were are you on the scared meter of life? Are you out there amongst it or a bit of a shy body or house mummys boy?

CONCLUSION IS ACTION

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you petrified.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you afraid.

If you are not liking what you see in the mirror, afraid to go down a dark street, scared of a potential confrontation then train now.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

We cant all be Bruce Lee but you also dont want to be an emotional and physical punching bag do you?

THE TRAINING ANSWER

The Martialarm is the only martial arts training dummy that bequeaths you consummate realism in all your martial arts training in kung fu, karate, krav maga, jeet kune do, tae kwon do, kempo and more.

The martialarm is unlike similar training dummies: The wooden dummy has been used for centuries as a solo training machine. In contemporary years, they've been provided accessible in different materials as well as synthetic. But still they all have one item in general:

They dont swing and they're all static.

The wooden dummy frequently costs hundreds of dollars but is still only produced to absorb your blows and step up your precision moves. It doesn't react to your attacks akin to a factual partner can. So although you get apt repetition training, which is acceptable for accomplishing the basics down, it may well be difficult to use and will get dreary so quickly.

Why A little Martial Artists Improve Faster Than Others

As martial artists, we all recognize this. Your martial arts instructor probably hammers the point home in practice every day. Alas, there are only so so many classes in a week and this can stunt your learning and headway.

You want to improve - swift. And you're keen put in your time with home training. But solo training can only take you so far due to the fact it lacks the interaction that only a assistant can award.

Until Now!

The martialarm introduction to hapkido

Hapkido practitioner becomes well-versed in many kicks, punches, and blocks. From Aiki-Jujitsu (the predecessor of Aikido) it gets most of its grappling techniques. Hence, the Hapkido practitioner spends an equated volume of time learning techniques such as throws and joint locks. The advantage of studying Hapkido versus studying one striking style and one grappling style is that the practitioner learns to use the two approaches to flatter one another. For example, a Hapkido artist would use a punch to disrupt her training partner while a challenging throw is set up. Conversely, a Hapkido performer can turn around or off-balance his opponent to decrease their knack to defend against a kick. Along these same lines, the Hapkido performer learns to counter in the opposite manner of an strike, hence mystifying the foe. As such, linear attacks are countered with a roundish technique and spherical attacks are countered with a linear technique. Hapkido artists furthermore become skilled at vital targets and pressure points in order to immobilise their attacker as fast as imaginable.

Hapkido - Very similar to traditional Hapkido, this contemporary version uses Muay Thai striking techniques as a replacement of getting its strikes.

Hapkido is a brand of self-defense that employs joint locks, pressure points, throws, kicks, and other strikes. Hapkido practitioners learn to counter the techniques of other martial arts as well as common "unskilled" attacks. There is also a range of traditional weapons including short stick, cane, rope, sword and staff which adjust in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined.

Albeit hapkido consist of both long and close range fighting techniques, the objective of most engagements is to get near for a close punch, lock, or throw. Hapkido emphasizes spherical motion, non-resisting movements, and ownership of the adversary. Practitioners seek to get advantage by the use of footwork and body positioning to employ leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength.

On the "hard-soft" scale of martial arts, hapkido stands everyplace in the center, employing "soft" techniques similar to jujitsu and aikido as well as "hard" techniques reminiscent of taekwondo and tangsoodo. Even the "hard" techniques, though, emphasize spherical rather than linear movements. Hapkido is an eclectic martial art, and different hapkido schools emphasize varied techniques. Then again, some core techniques are found in each school (kwan), and all techniques should follow the three principles of hapkido:

Right Hapkido tactics include using footwork and a series of kicks and hand strikes to bridge the distance with an foe. Afterward to instantaneously control the balance of the rival (naturally by manipulating the head and neck), for a take down or to isolate a wrist or arm and apply a joint twisting throw, depending upon the situation; Hapkido is a comprehensive system and as the rival's balance has been taken, there are a myriad of techniques to disable and overcome the foe.

Hapkido endeavors to be a absolutely comprehensive fighting style and as such strives to keep away from narrow specialization in any particular variety of technique or range of fighting. It maintains a wide range of tactics for striking, standing jointlocks, throwing techniques (both pure and joint manipulating throws) and pinning techniques. some classes as well incorporate tactics for ground fighting notwithstanding these tactics readily tend to be focused upon escaping, controlling, striking and gouging tactics over submissions and emphasizing the capability to take one's feet and situational awareness over pins.

Like most martial arts, hapkido employs a great number of punches and hand strikes, as well as elbow strikes. A distinctive example of hapkido hand techniques is "live hand" punch that focuses energy to the baek hwa hyul in the hand, causing energy strikes and internal strikes. The hand strikes are readily used to weaken the training partner ahead of joint locking and throwing, and additionally as finishing techniques. Hand striking in hapkido (unless in competition) is not localized to punches and open hand striking; some significance is given to striking with talons at the throat and eyes; pulling at the foe's genitals is also covered in established training. in order to recall hand strikes more easily in an emotionally charged situation, beginning students are taught usual, effective routines of blocks and counterattacks called Makko Chigi, which results to more compound techniques as the student becomes familiar with them.

A good deal of of hapkido's joint control techniques are cited to be derived largely From aikijujutsu. They are taught additionally to aikido techniques, but in general the circles are lesser and the techniques are applied in a more linear fashion. Hapkido's joint manipulation techniques attack both large joints (such as the elbow, shoulder, neck, back, knee, and hip) and small joints (such as wrists, fingers, ankles, toes, jaw)

Wristlocks Hapkido is well accepted for its use of a wide variety of wristlocks. These techniques are believed to have been derived From Daito-ryu aikijujutsu even though their manner of performance is not always alike to that of the parent art. Still many of the tactics found in hapkido are quite similar to those of Daito-ryu and of aikido which was derived From that art. These involve such tactics as the supinating wristlock, pronating wristlock, internal rotational wristlock and the utilizing of pressure points on the wrist and are ordinary to many types of Japanese jujutsu, Chinese qin na and even 'catch as catch can' brawling.

Elbowlocks Even if well recognized for its wristlocking techniques hapkido has an equally wide range of tactics which centre upon the manipulation of the elbow joint (see armlocks). The first self defense technique typically taught in many hapkido schools is the knifehand elbow press. This technique is thought to be derived From Daito-ryu's ippondori, a development of disarming and destroying the elbow joint of a sword wielding foe. Hapkido classically introduces this technique off a wrist grabbing strike where the defender makes a roundish movement with his hands to free themselves From their foe's grasp and applies a pronating wristlock while cutting down upon the elbow joint with their forearm, taking their rival down to the ground where an elbow lock is administered with one's hand or knee to immobolize the attacker in a pin. Interestingly both Daito-ryu and aikido opt for to use handpressure on the elbow during the technique rather than using the forearm as a 'hand blade', cutting the into elbow joint, in the hapkido manner.

Hapkido training can be realized in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of Hapkido to find a school near you!

An-introduction-to-brazilian-jiu-jitsu

An Introduction To Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

Even though it has been around for many years, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was made famous in the United States by Royce Gracie in the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Many people weren’t all that familiar with the style until Gracie entered the UFC and continued to dominate fighters of all styles and weight classes one after the other. Once people began to see how quickly Gracie could defeat an opponent, they quickly became interested in the art of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

As many now know, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is an art that is utilized with ground grappling, with very little stand up skills involved. A majority of the techniques used with the martial art are executed on the ground. The techniques involve very little strength from the stylist, as most of them are all about the technique behind the move. With Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu stylists that weight 100 lbs or less can quickly put a submission lock on someone who is 2 - 3 times their weight and size.

Even though Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is great for tournament fighting, isn’t so great against multiple attackers. With one on one fights it is very dominant, although if you are against multiple attackers it will be very hard to pull off one of the choke holds or arm locks. You simply won’t have the time to do it, as the other attackers will be trying to take your head off.

From the ground, utilizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, the stylist will have many options that he can utilize. He can pull off choke holds, arm locks, leg locks, and dozens of other techniques that can take someone out of the picture in a matter of seconds. When the stylist is on his back with the opponent on top of him he has the guard, which is where he wraps his legs around the attacker. From the guard position, the stylist can execute dozens of techniques - even though it may appear that he doesn’t stand a chance.

The mount, side control, and back mount are primary positions, along with the guard. The mount position is where the stylist is mounted on top of the attacker on the ground - a position where he can punch or execute a submission hold. With side control, the stylist is laying on the opponent’s chest, a position where he can easily execute an arm lock. Back mount is among the most dangerous positions - where the stylist is on the opponents back and really do some damage if the opponent has no Jiu-Jitsu experience.

With Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, the ranks start out at white belt, then move on to blue, purple, brown, and the highest color - black belt. To move through the ranks it takes a lot of practice and dedication, usually around 2 - 3 years per belt. Once a student reaches the black belt, he is capable of teaching other students what he knows. It takes a long time to reach this point, more than 10 years - although it is well worth it.

In the world of martial arts, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is very effective. It is one of the best martial arts for ground fighting, especially in tournaments. Ground grappling is very common with tournaments these days, which is why it pays to be a well rounded stylist. Very few martial arts styles can compete with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu on the ground, which is why so many people are deciding to study it. If you’ve decided to start studying this exceptional ground based martial art - you can pat yourself on the back for making a decision you won’t regret.

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Top reasons to try martial arts

Just about everyone knows about the popular martial arts, such as Karate, Tae Kwon Do, Kung Fu and Tai Chi...some people have even thought about trying out a class. Bt have you ever actually done it? Do you need a reason?

Just about everyone has thought about taking up a martial art at some point in time. Maybe as another way to stay in shape. Possibly as a means to protect yourself from the school bully. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of reasons why people choose to take up an art, but I want to take a second to outline what I feel are the most important reasons to at least try a martial art. Maybe it's for yourself, maybe it's for your children...whatever the reason, all martial arts contain a unique wealth of knowledge and discipline that you simply can't get anywhere else. My hope is that this article will inspire you to get out of your chair and into a school to see what martial arts is all about.

Self Confidence

As you train in martial arts, you will notice a lot if improvements, such as your physique, balance, awareness, flexibility, and many other physical and mental characteristics. Martial Arts will teach you how to combine these capabilities and use them to succeed in competitions, attaining higher belts, building friendships and protecting yourself if necessary. The more you can do, the more confident you will be.

Self Defense

One of the most common reasons to study martial arts is to learn how to defend one’s self. A number of schools may dedicate class time and/or offer a scheduled class that strictly goes over self defense tactics. Also, depending on the MA style or school, self defense can be a large part of the curriculum, which can be beneficial to those interested in "applicable arts" (arts you can use in everyday life) as opposed to "traditional arts".

Self Discipline

Webster defines self-discipline as the “correction or regulation of oneself for the sake of improvement”. Whether it be trying to make a high school team or meeting company deadlines, once you learn the focus necessary to succeed in Martial Arts you can apply it to the rest of your life. Success is mental, and Martial Arts will teach you the self discipline necessary to succeed at anything you put your mind to.

Coordination

Martial arts does require a lot of hand, foot, eye, and mental coordination, but all of this is developed over time. If you consider yourself as an uncoordinated person, training in the martial arts will help you grow those skills. You’ll be amazed what your body is capable of doing! Even if you are a natural athlete, standing on one foot, while kicking with the other, and blocking with your hands is quite difficult and involves coordination.

Fitness

Martial Arts does not have to focus only on fighting or self defense as some styles are based more on fitness. Tae Bo and Tai Chi are two examples of this. However, those with an interest in the fighting & self-defense aspects of Martial arts will find their fitness levels quicly increasing as training not only develops various muscle groups, but flexibility and balance as well. One's level of fitness can be just as important in winning a match as one's skills and abilities.

Family Enjoyment

Most people don't know that this is an excellent way to spend time together with your family! Some martial art schools allow families to train together and others separate classes by age groups. Regardless of how classes are segregated, families find themselves enjoying the time spent together. It is not unheard of having a family all test together for various ranks and black belts.

Meet New People - Martial Arts is for everyone...

Many martial art schools structure their classes into three age groups: Kids – usually ranging from about 5 to 11 years old, Teens – 12 to about 16 or 17, and Adults – usually starts at 18, but some schools make exceptions when necessary. Some schools also offer a “Little Dragons” program geared towards the 4 – 6 year old crowd. Age groups are then broken down into belt ranks allowing you to train with people that are relatively of equal skills and age. Often times people who begin martial arts together will develop a bonding friendship and even obtainin their black belts at the same time because they pushed one another during their tuff times.

Remember that there are thousands of martial art styles. Chances are there is a style and a school perfect for you no matter what your reasons are for trying it out. If you're interested in finding one near you, visit http://www. experiencemartialarts. com. You'll find more information about martial arts as well as a list of schools in your area.

An-introduction-to-aikido

An Introduction To Aikido

There’s no mistaken the fact that Aikido is one of the best and most popular martial art in the United States today. The art of Aikido is best associated with actor Steven Seagal, who made it even more popular with his movies. Aikido is rich and history in tradition, an art that originally started in Japan back in the 1940s.

Aikido’s founder, Morihei Ueshiba, was born on December 14, 1883. As he was growing up in modern Japan, Ueshiba witnessed the local thugs vandalize his father. The young boy decided that he would make himself strong in order to seek revenge against the thugs. Ueshiba was strong willed, and devoted every waking moment to physical training and martial arts.

He received a lot of certificates in jujitsu, spear fighting, and fencing. Even though he was very impressive with his abilities, he found himself not happy with his skills. He knew that there was more to it, and began to look into religion, hoping that he would find a greater significance with life - pursuing martial arts all the while.

Ueshiba founded the martial art of Aikido by combining both his religious beliefs and his training in martial arts. At that time, the style was known as aikibudo, it wasn’t until 1942 that he decided to go with the name Aikido. The style was quite different indeed, incorporating several different styles of jujitsu, aiki-jujitsu, and spear and sword fighting techniques as well.

Even though a lot of us think of Aikido as the ultimate martial art, it is an art that is based on religion and harmony. Aikido uses joint locks, weight manipulation, and throws to achieve it’s purpose. The martial art is very effective, which were the intentions of Ueshiba from the start. Aikido consists of many techniques, and it is the result of Ueshiba’s creative innovation.

Aside from what many think, there really is no unified belief or philosophy in the martial art of Aikido. While Aikido is indeed rich in heritage and religion, it believes in harmony and peace of the spirit. By achieving a higher spiritual power, Ueshiba has always believed that the human body is capable of anything. Even though he wanted revenge, he still stated that Aikido wasn’t about fighting, but rather a way to reconcile with the world and make every human being on giant family.

Over the years, Aikido was introduced in America with amazing results. Steven Seagal is by far the most popular, showing the world the power and harmony of Aikido through his many movies. There are a lot of martial arts dojo’s around North America that offer Aikido to study, possibly even some in your area. Not only will Aikido teach you self defense, but it will also teach you harmony of the spirit and how to find inner peace as well.

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The-many-styles-of-kung-fu

The Many Styles Of Kung Fu

The martial art known as Kung Fu is very old, yet very powerful. There are several different forms involved with Kung Fu, that only add to the power and mystique. Below, we will go over a majority of the different styles and forms that make up Kung Fu.

White Crane style

The spirit of the White Crane has led to what many martial artists consider to be the most graceful system of Kung Fu. The pattern for the White Crane style was patterned after a crane bird often found in marshes and open plains. The White Crane defense forms and attacks are nothing short of amazing, often known as “deadly beauty”.

Although the techniques within the White Crane style can take years to properly master, they simple and to the point. White Crane stylists are masters of self defense, although they are taught to avoid confrontations. Even though a stylist can handle himself in any situation, he will avoid a fight at all costs and only react with physical action when he is left with no choice.

Wing Chun

From a Chinese standpoint, Wing Chun is the essence that the opponent will attack, absorb, and then neutralize the attack. Then, the opponent or attacker will back off, pursue, then counter - disengage his restriction from arms, and then retaliate with a deadly and penetrating force.

This philosophy will take years to fully understand, and years of practice to master. Technically speaking, Wing Chun uses a steady and never ending forward flow of energy that’s based on the principle that a straight line is the shortest distance between two points.

Offensively, Wing Chun is all about a combination of intercepting and straight lines with deflecting arcs. In general, it is an aggressive close quarter style that pushes offensive attacks and takes the fight right to the attacker. In other words - Wing Chun doesn’t care nor does it put a lot of time towards the more traditional block and counter routines.

Hung Gar

Hung Gar is more or less an adaptation of the Tiger system of Shaolin that emphasizes close quarter techniques. Hung Gar isn’t much on distance fighting, although it is very effective in close quarter situations, such as alleys and in small rooms. It is a very strong system, teaching stylists to handle themselves properly in areas where other martial arts seem to fail.

Praying Mantis

Nearly 400 years ago, a man named Wang had a vision. Using a praying mantis that he was able to capture, Wang studied it’s movements. By using what he saw, he created and founded the style of Praying Mantis. Wang perfected his own martial art style by continuing to observe both the offensive and defensive movements of the praying mantis, and using them with his style.

The Monkey style

Even though it is thought of a comical approach to martial arts, the Monkey style is actually one of the deadliest martial arts systems in the world. This style dates back to the 1840s, when missionaries were first allowed passage into China.

The Monkey style all began when a peaceful maned named See resisted arrested after accidentally killing an officer of the law. See was sentenced to prison for his crime, where he spent all of his time watching the prison apes. He found them amazing, and would watch them from his cell, which his also helped to pass the time.

Over his ten year prison sentence, he studied the way the apes moved, paying very close attention to how they defended themselves and fought each other. Then, when he was released from prison, he adapted his style, becoming known as the Monkey Master. A lot of people joined him along the way, and began to learn his Monkey system which is still very effective today.

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Japanese samurai swords buying guide

When it comes to samurai swords, there is quite a bit of terminology for the new collector to understand. But we want to make it easy for anyone to find a good quality samurai sword that will last a lifetime, no matter if you’re looking for one of the very sought after Paul Chen Katana swords for battle or just a quality sword to hang over the mantle.

The first thing to consider for your new samurai sword is the type and quality of the blade. If you’re looking for a you want to be sure and choose a full tang blade, which all of our authentic samurai swords feature as well as all of our battle ready swords. The term “full tang” means that the blade and the part of the sword under the Tsuka (handle) is one long piece of steel. If you get a sword that is not full tang then you’re basically buying it to hang on the wall and nothing more.

The next thing to consider when choosing a sword is the type of steel that the blade is made of. There are basically 3 types of steel, 420 J2 (Stainless steel), High Carbon, and Folded steel. If you are looking for a battle ready sword you’ll want to stay away from the 420 J2 Stainless. High carbon steel is very high quality steel; however folded steel is the strongest. Actually it’s not that the folded steel is a different type of steel, but how the blade is forged.

A folded steel blade is typically made from high carbon steel. The difference is that a folded steel blade is just like it says; the steel is folded over and over again until the smith believes that it is adequate.

Some people say that a good high carbon steel blade can be just as strong as a folded steel blade. The smiths for the Thaitsuki Nihonto Swords claim to have mastered a form of forging high carbon steel blades that is just as strong if not stronger than many of the folded steel blades.

When choosing a sword samurai sword there are basically 3 different styles to consider, the katana sword, the Wakizashi sword and the Tanto sword. The Japanese Katana Sword is the most popular among collectors and martial arts students alike.

The katana sword was the first and is still the most popular of all samurai swords. The blade is typically 29” long with an overall length around 40”

The Wakizashi sword is the shorter companion blade of the katana sword. We first see the Wakizashi sword during the Muromachi period (1568-1603). The Wakizashi was about 18” long and only allowed to be carried by a samurai. Carrying both the katana and the Wakizashi was popular for the next few hundred years.

The smallest samurai sword would be the tanto sword or dagger. Originally tanto swords were 12” in length or less but it’s not out of the ordinary to come across a Tanto that is 15” long.

Samurai sword collecting is a very popular past time for many Americans. Something that is becoming even more popular is martial arts that make use of samurai sword for fighting and cutting exercises. The most popular and affordable authentic samurai swords are the Paul Chen Swords. You can find a decent Paul Chen Practical Katana Sword for under $200. However for less than a hundred more you can get yourself a Paul Chen Practical Plus Katana. If you’re looking for something a little more pricy the Paul Chen Bushido Katana or the Orchid Katana will last a lifetime and can take quite a beating. The Orchid and Bushido also come in a Wakizashi and Tanto.

In conclusion, the most important thing when buying your sword is that you know what kind of blade you're getting. If you want a functional sword be sure that you're not getting one that's only made to hang on the wall. If it's not clearly stated on the page for the sword, don't hesitate to contact the store to ask any questions you might have.

10 common-sense self defense tips for men

: For more than 30 years I have been running specialized self defence courses and seminars. Over that time I have shown thousands of people how to protect and look after themselves. Increasing personal safety ALWAYS commences with awareness. Since most men may be attacked in almost any situation and for a wide-ranging variety of reasons I offer the following advice. Here is a list of ten simple things that you can do immediately that will increase your safety: 1 - Most men get involved in physical trouble as a result of saying something rude, offensive, tactless, stupid or hurtful. Controlling what comes out of your mouth can keep it in good shape. Think before you speak. 2 - If a fight breaks out in a bar - leave immediately. Go before all the drunks and brawlers start swinging chairs, bottles, glasses and punches. A "free for all" usually starts with just two protagonists. Innocent bystanders often get hit. Those who leave all the fools to bash each other do not. 3 - NEVER attempt to mediate an argument between a man and a woman. Both will cease arguing or fighting with each other and turn on you - the common enemy. If you fear for the woman's safety, call the police. 4 - Understand that many people these days have a cocktail of drugs and booze in their veins. It makes them argumentative, aggressive and "Mike Tyson-esque." Avoid people who are "off the planet." Even a casual glance at them can set them off. Leave them with their own demons. 5 - Don't make the fatal mistake of thinking that ANYBODY fights "fair" any more. Those days are over - they have been since the John Wayne era! Expect multiple attackers, weapons, possibly both. 6 - The cemeteries are full of dead heroes. Don't add to their number. Run if you can. There is no shame in avoiding a fight. In fact, running away is smart. 7 - Recognize objects in every room of your home that could be used as makeshift weapons. Home invasion is a growing curse these days due to the unwillingness of our governments to protect their citizens. 8 - THIS IS MORE OF A LEGAL WARNING: Understand that if you allow yourself to be placed in a "compromising" position with a woman, particularly one who is "under-age," then the woman's version of events will usually be believed over the man's version. Do not allow yourself to get into such situations. 9 - Negotiation is a far higher art form than physical confrontation. Do anything reasonable to avoid a fight. NOTHING good ever comes out of conflict. War is proof of that. 10 - When all else fails, your back is to the wall and there is absolutely no other alternative left remember... "it is better to be tried by twelve than carried by six." Remember my opening words - "increasing personal safety ALWAYS commences with awareness." Increase your awareness, mind your manners, know your surroundings and you will certainly improve your safety. Please feel free to distribute this article. The only condition is that the resource box remains intact and that the article is not altered in any way.

Methods of qigong in kung fu training

Qigong is a general name for the systems of hardening and improvement of body and mind, treatment and health enhancement created in China. They primarily based on the ability to control your own consciousness, mentality and through them all the physiological processes of the organism. Practicing Qigong you can achieve stunning results some of which even the powerful modern science cannot conceive and explain.

There are three main categories of Qigong: Health-improving, Fighting and Mystical.

1. It was Chinese physicians who developed and evolved the Health-improving Qigong during many centuries. They created special exercises aimed to preserve and promote health as well as to cure various diseases.

2. Fighting (or Hard) Qigong was developed by those practitioners of Qigong who at the same time were masters of martial arts. These exercises serve to enhance the energy concentration in muscles and other parts of the body allowing to hugely increase the bodily strength and its resistance against the attempts to cause it a physical injury.

3. Mystical Qigong is a child of Buddhist monks and Taosian anchorites. The goal of Mystical Qigong consists in achieving the so called Enlightenment – a special psychophysical state of the human being. Taosian anchorites also developed methods of anti-aging based on Mystical Qigong. Mystical Qigong is the most difficult to master.

Qigong is not only the art of Qi energy control; it trains the mind and helps to work out the ability to control your volitional impulse. Qigong techniques include a huge variety of exercises but they all consist of the three main parts: control of position, control of breath, and control of mind.

Controlling his position, a man can acquire some optimal posture of body which would allow Qi to flow in the organism without delays or blockages not causing any disturbing feelings and removing diseases. The exercises are mostly performed in common stands, for example, in the Rider’s stance.

You need to control your breath to let the external Qi (from the air) not only to pass mechanically into the internal state but to spread along energy channels, fully feeding all the organs.

Consciousness is crucial in breath control; it distributes Qi along the body. At the highest stage, the breath is controlled at the level of subconsciousness and do not require too much of your attention.

Step by step learning to control his energy resources, a practitioner will pass from using the physical strength (Li) to the internal burst of effort (Tsin). This internal effort, as Chinese masters believe, is produced not by muscles but in tendons and marrow.

This is the reason why the most of Kung Fu exercises aimed not to increase the mass of muscles but to strengthen tendons and bones. While muscles tend to loose their strength (Li) as the man grows older, masters preserve their internal effort (Tsin) until great age. That’s why Chinese masters of Kung Fu say: “If you do not practice Fighting Qigong but train only your physical strength you’ll be left with nothing when you grow old enough.”

Qigong exercises advance “internal Qi” our organism contains. “Internal Qi” is also called “true Qi”. The state of “true Qi” depends on many factors: regular Fighting Qigong exercises, nutrition, mental state, environment, etc. Every human being has internal Qi but only few can use it properly, develop it. The Qi of the vast majority of people is destabilized. The goal of Fighting Qigong is to fill the organism with “true Qi”, calm it, make Qi flow along channels freely without obstructions.

So what is Qi after all? According to Chinese notions, it is an energetic substance which represents the foundation of all, i. e. the energetic foundation of the Universe. Our body can be compared to an electric appliance: if it is supplied with electric power it works but if the power supply is cut down the device operation stops. Likewise with the man: if Qi supply of his body is insufficient or it gets stagnant in it, the man gets sick or even dies.

To have a healthy robust body, one needs to learn how to keep the Qi circulation smooth and to be able to accumulate sufficient amount of Qi. To do so, it is necessary to understand the system of circulation and storage of Qi in your organism.

The human body has twelve so called primary channels (meridians) along which Qi is spread across the entire organism. There also exist eight “miraculous” vessels serving as a kind of reservoirs storing and regulating Qi. One end of each channel is attached to one of twelve internal organs while the other end is connected to one of fingers or toes.

These twelve channels supply with Qi energy twelve internal organs. Besides, these channels also take the excessive energy away from internal organs allowing us to through it out of the body. When due to blockage or disease the circulation of Qi along the channels is interrupted, one or several organs cannot get enough Qi which leads to their functional disturbance.

To be healthy, you need to learn how to keep the circulation of Qi in the twelve channels smooth and constantly replenish the “miraculous vessels” with energy.

If you understand the theory of Qi circulation in the human body you will be able to understand how Qi relates to martial arts as well. Remember, your body is not simply a machine it is an organism able to improve itself. The stronger Qi is, the stronger the human body gets.

Fighting Qigong practice sessions serve to enhance the capabilities of your body. We know that using our mind we can control various parts of our own body. The process of control is simple. Our mind generates a thought, and the thought leads Qi to the corresponding parts of the body which perform the requested action. The key thing about Fighting Qigong is in learning to lead your Qi as efficient as it can be. In this case you can increase you strength very much.

Chinese martial arts masters learn to focus their minds through meditation or other kinds of training practice to make Qi obey them easily. This can substantially enhance the strength of a fighter and increase the efficiency of his technique.

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